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Nintendo Villains by BrendanCorris

Because of the word limit, I am forced to get to the point. The picture is almost perfect. Every character is represented is an appropr...

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Here comes part four of the Teen Titans entries. In this show, it's quite tough to choose favorites sometimes, as many great TV shows tend to have a lot of memorable moments. However, there are some episodes that just stick out above the rest for some reason, be it the plotline or a specific scene. Here is my list of the top five Best Teen Titans episodes.

5: Only Human
I'm not going to lie. MANY episodes were going to be on this list, considering that it was such a large tie. However, Only Human does the best job at showing Cyborg's struggle to find out if he's more man than machine. In this episode, Cyborg beats someone named Atlas at a video game. This would've been a mundane thing if it weren't for the fact that Atlas is a robotic, egotistical bully who hates losing. Atlas challenges Cyborg in real life for the chance to save his friends after Atlas kidnaps them. However, Cyborg's hardware had limits, limts that initially hindered Cyborg and cost him the battle. Thankfully, he eventually convinced himself that it was the human part of him that could triumph over Atlas, and he won. This episode best shows that Cyborg is much more than a machine. In fact, he isn't a machine at all. He's only human, and the human drive to make oneself excel is a potent force indeed.

4: Masks
Season One might've been lackluster compared to its successors, but it does have its finer moments. Ironically, that finest moment is a moment when Robin has his not-so-finest moment, if you know what I mean. Here, Robin's desperation and obsession with Slade have reach an all-time high, making him take drastic measures to get him closer to his enemies. In this case, he creates the identity of Rex X, a thief with anti-Titan weaponry that seeks computer chips that will be used to get on Slade's good side. Of course, the Titans eventually figure out what's going on, and after Robin's plan crumbles, his friends are understandably upset by Robin's Red X fiasco, although they did forgive him with time. For someone like Robin to obsess over an enemy is one thing. To obsess over an enemy to the point of stooping to the level of a criminal is another. Seeing Robin this desperate makes for a very exciting episode, especially since this is the first time we see Robin ever reach a point where his obsession with Slade really starts getting to him. We see how determined Robin gets and how much he regrets his choices in the end, and when you couple these with Red X as a concept making its big debut, it really makes the episode stand out.

3: Spellbound
Raven has a few moments where she gets an interesting, deep episode. None have that deepness quite like Spellbound, though. In it, Raven meets a sorcerer who is trapped in an enchanted book and after Raven agrees to help free him, she sees him as the friend she never had. That is, if it weren't for the sorcerer actually being a dragon that the real sorcerer locked inside the book years ago. Seeing Raven find someone special made me happy, but seeing Raven tricked by the dragon, Malchior, was quite a profound betrayal, perhaps even more than Terra's. This is because Raven was a very lonely girl, so to betray her the way Malchior did is quite sickening. Raven thankfully gives him his just desserts, though, Sometimes its good to be a bookworm.

2. How Long is Forever?
This is what many people consider the "Heart of Ice" of Teen Titans. This is the big trend-setter, the one that really sets the rest of the show up for many deep episodes to follow. Here, Starfire tries to celebrate a Tamaranean holiday about friendship with her friends but Warp, a time-traveler, tries stealing a priceless artifact. He and Starfire are both sent two decades into the future, where Starfire learns that the Teen Titans broke up and have largely taken a turn for the worse since she vanished all those years ago. She does manage to make it back to the present, but not before challenging whether or not history can be changed. Starfire often got a lot of deep episodes dedicated to her, but this one beats them all. It gives you this sense of emptiness and despair due to its atmosphere and scenery, and the writing is solid. Absolutely solid. I can see why many fans love this episode. Its deepness barely unequaled, it would take something nearly masterful to top it...

1. Terra
Before I go on, let me explain something. I'm not exactly an overzealous fanboy, but I recognize a well written character when I see one onscreen. Many, though not all, episodes with Terra are written very well, and are easily some of the best episodes of the series. However, for fairness' sake and because I treat Terra's episodes almost like one big story, only one will be on the list. I chose Terra not because of its plot, exactly, even if it was relatively good, but for one scene in particular. It's when Terra and Beast Boy are sitting by the ocean, talking to each other. This one moment outside of an accident Terra makes is such a rare thing for her. No strings attached. No Slade. No insanity. No things changing. Just her and Beast Boy, happy together genuinely with nothing to bother them. There's something quite profound about her finally getting the happiness she needed, even if it was brief and would be sabotaged, at least they both have this moment, and so do Teen Titans fans. I guess, in the end, it's the little things in life that matter most and have a major impact on you.

Brace yourselves. There might be a part five on the way.
Finally, part three of the Teen Titans entries is about to begin! Here, the top five worst episodes of the show. They're few and far between, but many good shows often have that one episode or two that comes off as bad. This show is no different. Here they are, the worst episodes of the show.

5. Deep Six
Out of all of the episodes in season one, this one was rather dull. Trident was very bland as a villain mostly because of just how cliché he was. All he seemingly does is utter how perfect he is, making him very one-dimensional. Beast Boy's rivalry with Aqualad ended up not really standing out much. The same could be said for the plot, as well. Ultimately, it's just boring, but it was still okay regardless.

4. Fractured
On both the aftermath of Terra's departure and the eve of that season's climactic two-parter, the writers came up with one of the strangest episodes of Teen Titans I have ever seen. After Robin breaks his arm trying to defeat Johnny Rancid, what is essentially the Jar Jar Binks of Teen Titans comes by to try and fix it. The rest is history. The episode is true to form for a TT episode. With a show as random as this is, this blends in just fine. However, if Larry wasn't so annoying and immature, this episode wouldn't even be on this list. Larry made for one of the more childish supporting character in the show. Sadly, he was too childish at times, making him even more annoying. At least Jar Jar Binks was tolerable enough. Larry was barely tolerable. Only in a few instances did I not get bothered by him. Overall, however, it was an okay episode.

3. Don't Touch That Dial
Here's the situation: Control Freak is back, tries to invade TV, and the Titans must chase him through every channel and bring him to justice. It's an awesome concept for an episode with a scenario that is ripe with parody potential. Does the episode do this? Indeed it does. Does it do so effectively? Not always. While some parodies, like the Star Wars parody, were funny, others like the black and white movie, were not, and when the parodies were done badly, they were done REALLY badly. The humor and dialogue help to make up for this, due to the parodical nature of it actually succeeding in doing its job. The awkwardness of the episode was largely sporadic, though. The next episode on this list is awkward until the very end!

2. Mother May-Aye
While largely an okay concept for a crazy show like Teen Titans, the idea of implementing a Hansel and Gretal type of fairy tale into a show like this wasn't done right. Mother May-Aye herself is largely to blame for this, as her concept as a villainess was implemented both too well in the wrong ways and too poorly in the right ways all at the same time. On one hand, she appears in her human form too often, which, in my opinion, does too good a job at looking unpunchable, both in her behavior and her grandmotherly looks in said forms. On the other hand, the Titan that meant to oppose her is Starfire. Raven would've been a much better choice, as she is not just an aesthetic contrast to Raven, but also a sort of twisted inversion of Raven's mother. This missed opportunity, coupled with the awkwardness of Mother May-Aye's treatment of the Titans, especially where the H.I.V.E. Five are concerned, and things become too awkward. Not necessarily bad, but just very awkward.

1. Things Change
Before I go on, let me explain something. As a character, this iteration of Terra was always meant to be a tragic character, coming complete with what would essentially be a climactic self-sacrifice. However, here, in the series finale, she appears one final time, not as a Teen Titan, but as a bystander. Here, she pretends to be someone else because the memories of the past were most likely too traumatic for her. The situation makes perfect sense and the writing is relatively good, but its everything else that is absolutely horrid, especially in hindsight, when the events leading up to this moment are considered. For instance, it was clear that the writers intended to have Terra die in Aftershock Part 2, especially when the memorial is taken into account. Raven's line at the end of that episode was made just to calm down possible soccor moms, and it did its job quite well. However, what could've (and should've) happened was that the Titans put the memorial in a secure location in Titans Tower, where her progress could be monitored and a notification could be made in case Terra freed herself. Anyway, after that episode, Cyborg poses as a student in H.I.V.E. Academy. The student's name? Stone, a reference to Cyborg's last name. The student's powers? Earth-related. Slade was also eventually revived, belittling the point of Terra's sacrifice to an extent. Also, it seems that the Titans didn't bother doing enough despite saying otherwise, and would much rather chase after a possibly hostile alien/robot/whateverthatthingis, even going so far as to not contact any Honorary Titans to pick up the slack while they help out Beast Boy. This makes them relatively out of character. In this situation, the only "true friend" ended up being Terra herself, But actions in past episodes that influence this one, coupled with rather apathetic Teen Titans, aren't even the half of what is wrong with this episode. Another more important flaw this episode has is how Terra and Beast Boy handle the situation. Real friends wouldn't just let other friends suffer. But then again, that's not quite the problem. The actual problem is Terra's abandonment of her past at the expense of everyone else and her subsequent justification for it: "Things change, Beast Boy." This is very out of character for her, considering her sacrifice. As for Beast Boy, he was foolish enough to take what she said into consideration without thinking about the context. And now, the worst aspect of this episode: the moral. Unless this episode was supposed to be symbolic, then Terra represents the fans outgrowing Teen Titans and moving on to more mature subject matters. However, this wasn't supposed to be the series finale, so the symbolism is largely based on misinterpretations. What this really is is a poor attempt at teaching kids that change happens and not always for the better, but must be accepted. At the cost of character derailment, both minor and major, along with the cliffhanger-like nature of this episode's ending, this episode is by far the worst episode of the series.

Don't fret. A top five best Teen Titans episodes is coming soon.
This is part two of my Teen Titans journals. Teen Titans, as I indicated before, was a well-crafted series with story arcs that helped to cement the show's place as one of DC's, Cartoon Network's, and Warner Bros.'s finest cartoons, with engaging characters and great character development to go along with. With each new season and subsequent story arc, Teen Titans had something relatively new to offer. Not only that, but each new season had something that defined it that set it apart from each other. This list is dedicated to jotting down the top five seasons of Teen Titans from worst to best. Filler episodes and Starfire's arc don't count, as the former doesn't contribute much to the season and Starfire's arc is scattered across the seasons.

5. Teen Titans Season One: While this series did end up getting this show off the ground, it had one of the weakest arcs in the show, which in this case is Robin's. How ironic. Robin gets the short end of the stick when he is by far one of the most popular characters on the show. Anyway, in summary, Slade (Deathstroke), the main antagonist of this season, wants Robin to become his apprentice and eliminate the Teen Titans. Meanwhile, Robin's obsession with this enigmatic villain drives him to do morally dubious things, even making him go over the edge. When it comes to what Slade had in mind, it's a good plan. And yet, at the same time, it's also stupid, too. Slade often raises the stakes every time he appears, so there's really no question that he'd pose a threat to the heroes, which he does. But in this case, what makes this arc, and by extension, Slade's plan, so flawed is how Slade's scheme unravels. In this case, Robin gets himself infected with microscopic robots like the other Titans and tells Slade that his apprentice will be destroyed if Slade doesn't turn off the machines. Now, if Slade were in-character during this moment, he'd let the Titans perish. He doesn't. He is defeated in a surprisingly anti-climactic way. Slade had the Titans on the ropes and he just lets them go, It makes the somewhat ridiculous nature of his plan even sillier if he isn't going to go through with dealing with his enemies. In a later season, he REALLY loses it, but details about that will come later on this list. Anyway, the arc in question involves Robin doing a lot of dubious things, so it's interesting seeing Robin slowly eroded by Slade's mysteriousness, especially considering the fact that even when Robin was Slade's apprentice, Robin still fought back, completely unwilling to give in. But many other antagonists have done this sort of thing afterward, often doing a better job than Slade. Even that witch in one of the other seasons did a better job of breaking the Titans' willpower than Slade did, and she was essentially a joke character. All in all, season one's main arc wasn't special, but it helped give the series a decent audience. But seriously, Slade. Y u so dumb??

4. Teen Titans Season 3: Arguably a step in the right direction compared to Season One, it was Cyborg's turn to have an arc of his own. It also involves Starfire's finishing up as well, so that's cool, but Cyborg was largely the focus here. Yes, Cyborg will let you finish, Starfire, but Beyoncé was the real winner. Seriously speaking, though, the villain of this arc, Brother Blood, was made to be the Anti-Slade, and it shows. The summary of this arc is that, after Cyborg infiltrates H.I.V.E. Academy, he has a run-in with the headmaster, Brother Blood. After initially swaying Cyborg over to his side, Brother Blood becomes obsessed with his enemy when Cyborg resists his mind control powers. With the introduction of Titans East, Cyborg gets the chance to be a leader at long last and after a battle with Brother Blood, he shows that it is his spirit, not his machine parts, that give him his inner-strength. This was an interesting arc, I saw Brother Blood as Season One Slade done right. He was given Robin's obsessiveness, which made for quite a role reversal. Not only that, but with the introduction of Titans East, which not only could've opened a wider range of episode possibilities (which it did), the series now had the potential to create a spin-off, one that DOESN'T make the series look bad. Other than that, this season was much like Season One; anti-climactic ending coupled with nothing too special. And yet, it opened the door to many new possibilities, making it an improvement, albeit not by much.

3. Teen Titans Season 5: There goes that glass of milk again. Things are about to get intense in this season. Beast Boy gets his official arc! What's more is that his archenemies, the Brothethood of Evil, which consists of Madame Rouge, General Immortus, Mallah, and their leader, the Brain, make their big debut at long last. After being notified that the Doom Patrol, Beast Boy's old team, needs Beast Boy's help, Beast Boy and the other Titans cooperate with the Doom Patrol to take the Brotherhood of Evil down. After two missions with BB's old allies, the Teen Titans become the Brain's primary focus, no longer concerning himself with the Doom Patrol. The Teen Titans begin globe-trotting and trying to notify other young heroes and heroines about the Brotherhood of Evil once Honorary Titans go missing. After a few misadventures, the Brain finally makes his move, capturing Robin and hunting down large quantities of Titans, members of Titans East included. But Beast Boy proved to be a potent warrior and a great leader, resulting in the ultimate defeat of many of the Titans' enemies, the Brotherhood especially. This arc had you hooked. It introduced many new characters. Some were compelling, like Red Star, and others weren't. Unfortunately, Beast Boy didn't have too much of a role to play in this season, and this is essentially his TRUE arc. Other characters, such as Jinx, took some of the spotlight instead, and with the lack of filler episodes, this doesn't mean much good when it comes to character development on BB's part. He develops more during the final episode, which wasn't that well-written. However, having all of these familiar faces showing up proved to make up for some of this, even if it was ironically part of the problem as well, as it took time away from developing Beast Boy more. As for the Brain, He is perhaps one of the more successful antagonists, with enough connections and influence to make him a legitimate threat no matter how one could look at it. He was a strategist that was capable of bringing down Robin, arguably the most competent Titan on the show most of the time. The Brain's henchman are hit or miss. General Immortus was practically non-existent, Madame Rouge got annoying every now and then, but Mallah was dangerous enough and evil enough to be taken seriously and you could actually like him as a villain. If it weren't for the series finale being both a cliffhanger and poorly-written, this season would be higher on the list. Instead, it sits in the middle where it currently belongs.

2. Teen Titans Season 4: What was once going to be the series finale of Teen Titans ended up being one of more intense seasons. This is Raven's time in the limelight, so her archnemesis, Trigon the Terrible, finally makes a proper introduction this time around. In this season, Raven's birthday is coming up, and on that birthday, the world will end. With the revival of Slade, things get bad to worse as he and an army of demons seek to use Raven as a gateway for Trigon, allowing him to exit his prison and rule over the universe's remains. However, thanks to her friends, she is able gain the power to defeat her father once and for all. Trigon makes for a dark antagonist, one who actually succeeds in his plans initially, but fails anyway. The stakes are high, and Ravens struggles throughout the season make the victory over Trigon satisfying. There isn't much to say other than that this was the series at one of its darkest moments. Admittedly, however, it is largely due to the writing and the plot that makes this season compelling. Everything else just seems par to the course. In short, this was a solid season that excelled where it mattered most. And now, for the grand finale... Well, kinda, if you know what is meant by this...

1. Teen Titans Season Two: Need the NintendoCapriSun quote be used again? Alrighty then. There goes that glass of milk again!! This season is the magnum opus of the show, with an arc that pulls you in and never lets go, not until the very bitter end! This is essentialy Beast Boy's first arc, but for all intents and purposes, a certain young girl takes the spotlight here. Her name is Terra. She was a Teen Titan. She is a true friend. Time to be taught the teachings of Markovism, young Padawons. Come closer, and you shall be told a tale. In all seriousness, though, the arc went like this. The Teen Titans meet their future sixth member, Terra, as she is leading a large scorpion monster into a trap. After defeating the creature, the Titans take Terra in and, after a mission involving Slade, Terra is eventually convinced that the Titans are no good after a secret involving her powers not being in control is exposed. She comes back sometime later with full control of her geomancy powers, much to delight of everyone but Raven, who was suspicious of her sudden improvement. After gaining their trust, Terra would go on a date with Beast Boy, who was infatuated with Terra at the time, so this appeared to be working out for the both of them. Not true, for while Terra and Beast Boy were on their date, the Titans were under attack. It turned out that Terra was a mole, sabotaging the Titans from within, only Terra wasn't feeling too good about what she did. Sadly for her, Beast Boy broke up with her after finding out about her betrayal, and it sent Terra to the dark side almost completely. Terra ultimately devastates the Titans sometime afterward during a series of ambushes, leading to the devastation of Jump City. However, the Titans return with a vengeance, forcing Terra to flee. Slade abused her for running, making her realize that she's been duped. Beast Boy manages to reason with Terra, who has the honor of destroying Slade for what initially looks like once and for all. However, she did this by activating an inactive volcano, a natural diaster she sacrificed herself to stop, but not before a tearful farewell to Beast Boy. At the end, Terra is turned to stone and her friends mourn her loss, leaving a memorial in her honor. Needless to say, this complicated yet intricate arc made for a fantastic improvement over Season One. Terra developed so well during this season, as did Beast Boy, who essentially had the honor of having two arcs dedicated to him during the entire show's run. Anyway, Tara Markov, a.k.a. Terra, was a villainess in the original comics. Her change from a deranged psycho to a troubled young girl made her the Mr. Freeze of the series, an antagonist that people can sympathize with to the point that, where it matters, you really start rooting for her. Mind you, Aftershock pt. I was another story, but pity can still be felt for her during that episode, so there might be some sympathy still left. Beast Boy was at his fiercest in this season, with good writing to amplify the quality of it. Slade was back, and this time, he had a more dangerous, albeit predictable, plot. He was also at his most evil, abusing the mental issues that Terra had and turned her into a weapon of mass destruction. By the time it's over, you are reminded of why Slade is regarded as one of the Titans' most popular and most important enemies. The arc itself isn't the kind of dark that Season 4 is. No. Not at all. Rather, it's a special kind of dark, one that can be a shock to see on TV. Think about it like this. This show had the guts to, for all intents and purposes, have what is essentially a child being killed off (until the series finale, at least). What makes this even darker is the fact that you not only see it happen, but the events leading up to it and the kind of person Terra was before her "death". All of those conflicts, all of that emotion, and all of those times Terra was involved improved upon the series, settings the standards higher than ever. In short, the Terra arc proved to be the best thing that ever happened to Teen Titans, and may it be remembered as the show's best arc, even if the series finale's poor writing tarnished it a little.

And there you have it, folks. Part three is coming up next.
THE FOLLOWING IS A JOURNAL ENTRY EXPLAINING THE PURPOSE OF TEEN TITANS GO! BASED ON RESEARCH I HAVE DONE. APPROACH THIS WITH AN OPEN MIND.

Back in the 2Ks, there was a little show on Cartoon Network that was seemingly made to cash-in on the success of the anime craze at the time. This show took five out of eight superheroes from a comic series lots of people loved, especially in the 80's, and made a TV show that is now widely regarded as among the best shows produced by DC and Warner Bros. Entertainment. That show is Teen Titans, and what a show it was.

The show had it all. Teen Titans had plot, it had character depth and development, it had a good soundtrack, it had marvelous voice acting, and while the anime style may have made some people miss out on the series, many others flocked to the TV screen, hungry for more of the proverbial eye candy. But after episode 65, "Things Change", which is, for all intents and purposes, a disservice in and of itself (I'll delve into that some other day), the series was forcibly scrapped once the movie Trouble in Tokyo was over with. No clear reason was given for this, as several sources said many different thing, ranging from no plans for a Season Six to a bad season pitch involving international Titans Towers and that white monster from that aforementioned episode. Regardless, the fans demanded the creation of another season. This would go on for many years, and despite characters like Cinderblock and Billy Numerous appearing in mainstream publications of DC comics, the show would end up being forced into the background...

A series of shorts called The New Teen Titans were made many years after the show's run. Due to the success of these shorts, a new show was developed, one that caused much more harm than good for many people. And yet, it has defenders, those whose taste in cartoons greatly differ from their predecessors. This show is "Teen Titans GO!", and it's, in many ways, everything Teen Titans wasn't. Here's what I'm talking about:

Whereas there was a balance between goofy and serious in Teen Titans, this new show is just silly, and not in a good way either, as the comedy is largely something that can be viewed as juvenile. Also, do keep in mind that the original show had a Y7 rating in the US while TTG has a PG rating, so it isn't like all of the bad humor is directed toward young children. PG is, after all, the same rating The Simpsons has, and that show is directed toward adults. Think about that for a minute.

Whereas the plots were well-written and characters were largely three-dimensional and likeable, this new series has little to no plot whatsoever and the characters are not only OOC (Out Of Character), but they were repulsively antagonistic. Every Teen Titan most people grew up watching with are now essentially empty husks of their former selves. Here is a brief rundown on the thing that this show has done to our favorite characters (or at least the more notable things):

Robin is arrogant, incompetent and cruel, which is most certainly a far cry from the Robin of old, who, while strict, often meant well and was capable of taking down superpowered foes all on his own.

Raven is essentially a pegasister, meaning she likes things like unicorns and ponies and other such things. The Teen Titans Raven loathed the happy and cheerful stuff, so this makes no sense with the character.

Cyborg is a doofus in the new show while he was a genius in the old one. Not only that, but in battle, he could be very serious when it mattered, even though he was largely a goofy character to begin with. It's just that in Teen Titans Go!, any and all deep, meaningful aspects of himself, such as his desire to become completely human, are gone, leaving behind an empty character.

Starfire exists solely to be Robin's love interest and ONLY as Robin's love interest, while in the old show, she had much more depth to her character, which made her relatable. Her love for Robin is also greatly damaged by this show, as it's now too one-sided, with Robin attracted to Starfire and Starfire seeing Robin only as a good friend.

Beast Boy is not a vegetarian anymore, is a bad friend and is by far one of the most uncaring, sadistic Titans on the team (minus certain episodes where Terra is involved), whereas the Beast Boy of old was kind, caring toward his friends, and of course, a vegetarian. Beast Boy is arguably one of the most three-dimensional characters on the old show, being both a source of comedy and seriousness. Beast Boy has this blend emphasized on even more than Cyborg does, and this says wonders about the depth of his character. The new Beast Boy doesn't have this, and that's a shame.

Speaking of Terra, she is much more like her comic counterpart here, rather than her past TV show version, going from one of the most human characters I've ever seen on the old show, to someone far less than noble. In the original comics, she was a sadistic, treacherous and impossibly immoral psychopath who was also Slade's hired help. In the old show, she was an insecure young girl who Slade took advantage of, turning a once gentle girl into a weapon of war, only for her to turn good again and save her friends. That Terra also loved BB. This Terra is just plain mean, and the approach to her relationship with Beast Boy was different, to say the least. More specifically, she hates Beast Boy quite a bit.

This isn't even half of it. The villains are largely background characters, meaning that action is not much of a focus. And this is supposed to be a superhero show. Some of the villains are also OOC as well. For instance, Trigon the Terrible, one of the most serious villains on the old show (some might even say that he was worse than Slade) is reduced to the absent father trope, effectively making him much less serious. He even wears a pink sweater. As for Slade, he just plain doesn't exist here because the show's creators thought he was too serious for it. Oh, so a psychopath gets the axe but a psychopathic, genocidal super-serious demon king gets in? Makes perfect sense...NOT.

The reason why Batman and the like weren't mentioned in the old series was due to the creators wanting the Titans to be independent. This show shoves Batman and the like practically everywhere when the oppurtunity presents itself, with one episode being called "Sidekicks", defeating the purpose of the Teen Titans' former independence.

The worst part about this is that the producers of Teen Titans GO! didn't watch many episodes of the old show, so they really don't know what they're doing. Or do they? In the TTG episode "Dreams", one of the characters, specifically Robin, has a dream sequence where he dreams about Trouble in Tokyo, but it's dubbed over to be silly. It was much more of an insult than just a mere parody, something which, by its very definition, is meant to make fun of the work of someone else while respecting the material it is based on. So yes, if the creators of this "spin-off" didn't watch the movie or see any episodes, then they clearly did their homework AFTER the series started, once the damage was already done.

Oh, and don't get me started on the Young Justice crossover. That's just CN's attempt to get more people to watch the new show, and as soon as that crossover is successful (that is, if it IS successful), then CN will simply use this as an excuse to keep TTG up and running while Young Justice stays dead. Needless to say, even Young Justice fans have a reason to complain here.

Let me use the fourth season of Batman: the Animated Series as an example of how to properly revive a series. B:TAS was one of the most well-written cartoons ever made, not to mention one of the most influential cartoons when the comics it's based on is considered. This show is responsible for the creation of Harley Quinn, the famous right-hand henchwoman of the Joker, the recreation of Mr. Freeze into a more serious and likeable antagonist that also set the trend for many other villians to follow, and is single handedly responsible for providing the go-to voices for Batman and the Joker, with many other voice actors often attempting to replicate their voice quality. When season three ended, that was it. The show was over. But years of petitioning led to the show's revival, and while the show's art direction and quality was different, it was largely successful, providing one more season for this show to entertain us with in the best way that it could. Teen Titans did the same thing. In fact, Mr. Freeze and Terra are quite alike in regards to recreation, as both were viewed as disposable characters until their respective reimaginings. Alas and alack, Teen Titans was given the short end of the stick, and now mostly everyone is mad. It's as if the creators WANTED to insult the fanbase.

Come to think of it, from the very beginning, it seemed like Cartoon Network wasn't giving the fans as good a treatment as they were expecting. The show, like many others, was forced to be on Boomerang for awhile and was removed sometime later, completely omitting it from TV. The new show is clearly meant to be directed toward the fans. After all, seeing as the rating for it is PG as I stated before, the immature and sometimes disgusting humor, OOC Titans and general slaps to the face appear to have been meant as insults as opposed to poking fun at the old series all the while respecting the legacy it left behind. It would seem that after all that time dealing with petition after petition, something went wrong and CN was unwilling to give them what they want even if they know that they will only benefit from bringing the show back for real. I don't know why a television company like Cartoon Network, one of the major players of the 90's and 2K's, would ever really tolerate the existence of shows like this one. But whatever the case may be, it's detrimental to the network and its fans to allow an abundance of shows like this to exist. This self-destructive behavior will doom CN if this continues, and it will be their fault for not listening to reason in time.

As stated above, the definition of a parody is to mock the work of other people, be it entire stories, video game franchises, or even characters. Heck, Deadpool is a parody of Deathstroke, a.k.a. Slade Wilson, so there's a nice example right there. Parodies, however, are meant to be funny and respect the source material. This feels more like a burlesque, a work that seeks laughs at the expense of the material it's making fun of. Perhaps it would've been funnier if years upon years of petitioning weren't largely in vain because someone chose to make fun of the show people fought to bring back for over a decade. And also, not only is the old show being mocked, but so are its fans. With several throwbacks to the old show thrown in and perverted, along with nods to the fandom like the song "Fade Away", a song sung by Greg Cipes, Beast Boy's VA in both shows, for an episode in which Terra is treated as a villain again, how can this show be seen as anything but an insult to you guys? And more importantly, how can this show be considered seperate from the old series when so many things and people, including the voice actors, are re-used and, in the case of some of the music, remixed? The answer is simple: it can't. It just can't. This is why most defenders often don't get the big picture. They just assume that "it's for kids" and that "it should be treated as it's own thing" because they never did the research like I did.

Oh, and one more thing. It isn't like the entire team working on the show wanted to insult anyone, so don't blame the animators, voice actors, or anyone else like that. From what I understand, they had good intentions in mind. Even the voice actors want another season, so it's essentially a given that they care about their fans, and I respect them completely. We need to blame those responsible, not innocent people who are either just doing their jobs or want to reunite with old friends. Tara Strong, the VA of Raven, is particularly against bullying and is vocal about it, so if she or anyone else is somehow reading this, it isn't directed toward you or anyone else like you. The creators, on the other hand, are a different story. They must treat the fans much more seriously instead of the creators either mocking their critics or insulting the only reason this new show exists.

Inform me of anything in case I may have been misinformed in the comments section. For now, treat this as part one of something much bigger.

deviantID

NeonBlobfish
The One You Least Expect
United States
Here comes part four of the Teen Titans entries. In this show, it's quite tough to choose favorites sometimes, as many great TV shows tend to have a lot of memorable moments. However, there are some episodes that just stick out above the rest for some reason, be it the plotline or a specific scene. Here is my list of the top five Best Teen Titans episodes.

5: Only Human
I'm not going to lie. MANY episodes were going to be on this list, considering that it was such a large tie. However, Only Human does the best job at showing Cyborg's struggle to find out if he's more man than machine. In this episode, Cyborg beats someone named Atlas at a video game. This would've been a mundane thing if it weren't for the fact that Atlas is a robotic, egotistical bully who hates losing. Atlas challenges Cyborg in real life for the chance to save his friends after Atlas kidnaps them. However, Cyborg's hardware had limits, limts that initially hindered Cyborg and cost him the battle. Thankfully, he eventually convinced himself that it was the human part of him that could triumph over Atlas, and he won. This episode best shows that Cyborg is much more than a machine. In fact, he isn't a machine at all. He's only human, and the human drive to make oneself excel is a potent force indeed.

4: Masks
Season One might've been lackluster compared to its successors, but it does have its finer moments. Ironically, that finest moment is a moment when Robin has his not-so-finest moment, if you know what I mean. Here, Robin's desperation and obsession with Slade have reach an all-time high, making him take drastic measures to get him closer to his enemies. In this case, he creates the identity of Rex X, a thief with anti-Titan weaponry that seeks computer chips that will be used to get on Slade's good side. Of course, the Titans eventually figure out what's going on, and after Robin's plan crumbles, his friends are understandably upset by Robin's Red X fiasco, although they did forgive him with time. For someone like Robin to obsess over an enemy is one thing. To obsess over an enemy to the point of stooping to the level of a criminal is another. Seeing Robin this desperate makes for a very exciting episode, especially since this is the first time we see Robin ever reach a point where his obsession with Slade really starts getting to him. We see how determined Robin gets and how much he regrets his choices in the end, and when you couple these with Red X as a concept making its big debut, it really makes the episode stand out.

3: Spellbound
Raven has a few moments where she gets an interesting, deep episode. None have that deepness quite like Spellbound, though. In it, Raven meets a sorcerer who is trapped in an enchanted book and after Raven agrees to help free him, she sees him as the friend she never had. That is, if it weren't for the sorcerer actually being a dragon that the real sorcerer locked inside the book years ago. Seeing Raven find someone special made me happy, but seeing Raven tricked by the dragon, Malchior, was quite a profound betrayal, perhaps even more than Terra's. This is because Raven was a very lonely girl, so to betray her the way Malchior did is quite sickening. Raven thankfully gives him his just desserts, though, Sometimes its good to be a bookworm.

2. How Long is Forever?
This is what many people consider the "Heart of Ice" of Teen Titans. This is the big trend-setter, the one that really sets the rest of the show up for many deep episodes to follow. Here, Starfire tries to celebrate a Tamaranean holiday about friendship with her friends but Warp, a time-traveler, tries stealing a priceless artifact. He and Starfire are both sent two decades into the future, where Starfire learns that the Teen Titans broke up and have largely taken a turn for the worse since she vanished all those years ago. She does manage to make it back to the present, but not before challenging whether or not history can be changed. Starfire often got a lot of deep episodes dedicated to her, but this one beats them all. It gives you this sense of emptiness and despair due to its atmosphere and scenery, and the writing is solid. Absolutely solid. I can see why many fans love this episode. Its deepness barely unequaled, it would take something nearly masterful to top it...

1. Terra
Before I go on, let me explain something. I'm not exactly an overzealous fanboy, but I recognize a well written character when I see one onscreen. Many, though not all, episodes with Terra are written very well, and are easily some of the best episodes of the series. However, for fairness' sake and because I treat Terra's episodes almost like one big story, only one will be on the list. I chose Terra not because of its plot, exactly, even if it was relatively good, but for one scene in particular. It's when Terra and Beast Boy are sitting by the ocean, talking to each other. This one moment outside of an accident Terra makes is such a rare thing for her. No strings attached. No Slade. No insanity. No things changing. Just her and Beast Boy, happy together genuinely with nothing to bother them. There's something quite profound about her finally getting the happiness she needed, even if it was brief and would be sabotaged, at least they both have this moment, and so do Teen Titans fans. I guess, in the end, it's the little things in life that matter most and have a major impact on you.

Brace yourselves. There might be a part five on the way.

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:iconrokusho1345:
rokusho1345 Featured By Owner 1 day ago
Thanks for the fav!
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:iconneonblobfish:
NeonBlobfish Featured By Owner 1 day ago
No problem.
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cuteygirl226 Featured By Owner Oct 21, 2014  Student Digital Artist
Thanks for the watch ^^
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:iconneonblobfish:
NeonBlobfish Featured By Owner Oct 21, 2014
No problem.
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MileniaKitsuvee Featured By Owner Oct 18, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks for the watch n.n
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:iconneonblobfish:
NeonBlobfish Featured By Owner Oct 19, 2014
No problem.
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docterzero Featured By Owner Oct 16, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thanks for the watch! here have a Llama!
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:iconneonblobfish:
NeonBlobfish Featured By Owner Oct 16, 2014
No problem.
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:icondocterzero:
docterzero Featured By Owner Oct 17, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
All is hell that ends well!
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JustAutumn Featured By Owner Oct 11, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks for the watch! :la:
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